ANOTHER SIDE TRIP

13/03/2014    A quick visit to South West Australia

I am now staying with Linda, a really good friend who lives in Perth with her daughter, Emma and a Japanese home stay student Keida (who leaves us in a few weeks).

Smile everyone.

Smile everyone.

Here we have Linda taking a picture of the two girls who are trying not to look cold in the blustery weather.  We are at the blow holes just west of Albany, close by is a closed down whaling station, (which made for a very grim visit).

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That’s a better smile at least.

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The seas are very turbulent in this area, this is looking west of the blow hole.  Unfortunately I failed to get a picture of the blow hole blowing, but had some spectacular near misses (which just looked like rocks!).

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This is the view looking the other way. Imagine falling in there, it was going like a fast washing machine, no one would stand a chance of surviving.

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This is how you put up a camper trailer, thanks Emma.  Linda’s camper trailer is very easy to put up, it virtually does it itself, which is great because the girls are able to do this themselves and it is their bedroom.  From Pagoda Point Caravan Park we have a lovely view of Albany, lots of water birds and tranquil seas.

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Here is Linda showing off her new (second hand) VW Discoverer Transporter.  A very nice van, diesel, power steering, air conditioner, two single beds, just right for the more mature ladies. And a cup of tea in bed in the morning.

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Early evening saw the pelican parade on the small jetty, Albany in the distance.

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Beautiful pink sunset on the still waters.

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And looking the other way.  Beautiful relaxing place.

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Ocean Beach, Denmark, WA that is.  Clear water, this is a channel that runs inland a bit when the tide comes in and creates a great place for young children to play.

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Out in the ‘real’ sea only surfers and strong swimmers venture.

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Wind power on the hills, the channel runs along by the dunes in the background.  The bay runs steeply down into the water.

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Greens Pool, William Bay National Park, also very turbulent at this time.  Apparently it is usually really calm and placid. We certainly weren’t going to brave it in the water.

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This little chap looked much the worse for wear, maybe he had come in from the sea.  I have no idea what it is, any ideas anyone?  We did spot a few others sunning themselves on the warm rocks right by the water’s edge.  I have never seen “water dragons” by the sea before and I’m very curious.

6/8/2014 Have now found out that this is a King’s Skink (Egernia Kingii) – “This large skink occurs in rocky coastal areas of south-western Australia, from Esperance in the south to as far north as Dirk Hartog Island. It is a robus lizard, feeding on insects, mice, broken eggs or sea birds, and any edible objects it finds.”   Thanks Jim.

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Lastly, the Tree Top Walk at the Valley of the Giants.  “Experience the excitement of walking 40 metres high through the canopy of the tingle forest and enjoy the majestic views to core wilderness areas.  A walk trail links the Tree Top Walk to the Ancient Empire boardwalk where you can get up close and personal to the 400-year-old giants of the forest.”

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In the Walpole Wilderness National Park.  Sorry I couldn’t stop taking photos.

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“A very well constructed walkway with a gradual ascent offers the opportunity to experience the tops of the giant tingle trees in complete safety.  The treetop walk is actually a series of lightweight steel trusses built on steel pylons to form a circuit 420 metres long leading over a deep red tinge gully. As the gully descends, you ascend. It’s a gradual climb into the treetops.

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Eucalyptus guilfoylei – Yellow tingle flower, clusters of creamy yellow flowers.

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The Walpole-Nornalup National Park is the only place where the red tingle tree (Eucalyptus Jacksonii) is found. This buttressed, rough barked tree can live over 400 years and grows up to 75 metres in height, and with a girth of up to 26 metres, they have the largest base of all the eucalypts.  The Giants are the giant red tingle trees which are only found in this particular area of the Walpole Wilderness Area.

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And here’s my very favourite, I can just imagine Little Red Riding Hood skipping along past this tree with the wolf hiding behind it, typical Disney style.

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Categories: South West Western Australia, TRAVEL, Western Australia | Tags: | 4 Comments

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4 thoughts on “ANOTHER SIDE TRIP

  1. Mal and Rose

    fantastic photos. The walk in the tree tops looks awesome.I might have to come over for a look when I have some spare time.Rose

    Like

  2. Chris

    Looks like awesome scenery. We are lucky to live in such a beautiful country.

    Like

  3. Chris

    Mum says she remembers going to Albany and Perth.

    Like

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